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Easy and Stylish Work Outfits

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It’s not always easy getting dressed for work, especially since dress codes are starting to trend more towards casual than professional. You used to wake up, put on a suit or dress (and stockings of course!), and head out the door.

Now, it’s much more complicated.

What does business casual mean? How can I wear jeans without looking sloppy?

The answers to these questions aren’t simple and can’t be contained in just one blog post. However, I hope to provide you some ideas and insight that will make your morning ‘getting ready for work’ routine a little bit better.

Ps. All outfit pictures are from pinterest and can be found here.

Keeping your work wardrobe to just neutral colors with one or two signature colors makes dressing easy AND it looks sophisticated. I call that a win-win.

You can never go wrong with a button down blouse and a pair of pants. Tuck in the shirt and add a belt for a professional look.

Tip #1: Know your dress code. Every company has their own dress code. If you don’t know the dress code for your workplace, ask your Human Resources professional. This will help provide a clear yes and no to what you can and can’t wear.

Jackets make everything look more polished- and are a must on jean Fridays (they balance out the informality of jeans and still keep you looking like the pro you are).

Tip #2: Know what looks good on your body shape. If you are a pear shape (have wider hips/booty and a smaller bust/shoulder area) then you will tend to look better in darker bottoms. Knowing what flatters your body shape will help make shopping and putting outfits together easier. Find out your body shape and how to dress for it here.

Invest in a few dresses that are flattering and professional. I have found that Calvin Klein (available at most department stores) dresses look great on most body shapes. They are also easy to wear with heels (if you want to dress things up) or flats (for a more casual look).

Tip #3: I get dressed in under 3 minutes every day. How? I have a special formula I use that is now second nature to me. By mentally going through the formula when I get ready, I don’t have to think twice about what I’m doing (which is good, because there’s only so much thinking I’m capable of that early in the morning!) Keep scrolling to get the free webinar and start saving time in the mornings.

What’s the hardest part about picking out work outfits for you? Comment below and I’ll write a blog post about it!

Cheers,

Leslie

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Inappropriate workplace dress: should you just be more open?

FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinI was sitting at lunch yesterday when my dining partner said something I’ve heard several times: “I feel like young employees have no idea what is appropriate and what isn’t in terms of workplace dress.”

Usually, when this comes up, friends and acquaintances will then go on to recount their own personal experiences of fashion faux pas, ranging from barefoot interns to visible tramp stamps on new hires. And lastly, this is the part I found most interesting, they always follow it up with self-blame.

“Maybe I’m not being open enough, but I don’t think it’s appropriate.”

Maybe I’m just old fashioned and these things are acceptable now.”

It wasn’t just my polished and very professional lunch buddy the other day who has relayed these thoughts to me. I hear it all the time, usually from middle-aged or older women who hold very good positions within their companies. So what’s going on here?

Appropriate work dress in the 1940’s. If not much has changed in the last 75 years, then I guarantee things like tattoos, piercings, and athletic wear are not making an office debut anytime soon.

For one, it has nothing to do with you not being ‘open enough’ so stop blaming yourself.

Period.

Appropriate workplace attire hasn’t changed that much in the past several decades and it’s probably not going to change that much in the near future. Sure, trends and silhouettes change, but shoulder pads are not the same as neck tattoos. If you work in a corporate setting, the biggest sartorial change in the last 50 years is that it is more acceptable to not wear panty hose.

That’s pretty much it.

Even though miniskirts were big in the 60’s or tube tops ruled the 90’s, you still didn’t see these trends infiltrating the corporate workplace.

Likewise, tattoos, sneakers, and multiple piercings may be acceptable in society, but that doesn’t mean they belong in a board room. We need to learn to segregate and compartmentalize what is acceptable in the workplace and what is acceptable in public in general.

Should you scowl and shake your finger at every neck tattoo you see? No, that would be rude.

Should you say something if you see that same neck tattoo in your corporate office? Yes, because the reputation of the company, and not just the individual, is now on the line.

Which leads us to the next point- how to deal with inappropriate dress at work.

First of all, your workplace should have an up to date dress code. No matter how small your business is, having a policy in place when it comes to dress will help make confrontations smoother and more objective. Without a dress code, you will look like you are picking on people and critiquing them for their personal style.

With a policy, you simply need to state what the company has defined as appropriate and ask the employee to stay within those bounds. Another key part, is to make sure your dress code is up to date. It may have been utterly unfathomable that anyone would come to work in a halter top fifty years ago when your dress code was first written. If you don’t make changes to update your policy, then you run the risk of having interns who think it’s okay to trod around the office barefoot. There are plenty of sample dress codes you can find online and make you own. If you’re business is bigger, you can always call upon an Image Consulting professional to help you draft an effective dress code for your company.

Side note: If you’re reading this wondering how you can dress better for work…this is my best advice: start with basics that are work friendly. When your basics are appropriate for work, everything else will fall into place. Not sure what basics I’m talking about? See my top 20 basics every woman needs here. 

When you see inappropriate dress in the workplace, do something! If the person in question is not your direct report, contact their supervisor or human resources about your concerns. As I mentioned before, each employee not only represents themselves, but the company as a whole.

In the most basic sense, when you are hired on with a company, they are paying you to carry out their values and beliefs.

If you get hired as a barista at Starbucks, you are being paid to carry out their values of great coffee to the masses. If you are hired as the CEO of Google, you are being paid to advance the mission of Google at the top most level. It’s easy to forget that we are here for the employer rather than the employer being here for us. If our appearance doesn’t line up with the values we’re supposed to be representing, then something needs to change. If you don’t stand up against improper image in the workplace, the reputation of your organization might be at stake.



If reading this makes you upset, don’t get all huffy and start ranting about stifling creativity and identity. Instead, find a company whose culture matches your values. If you feel taking your nose ring out compromises who you are, then don’t apply for a job at a large business consulting firm. Find a more boutique consulting firm that values individuality. You’ll be a better employee, a better representative of the company, and won’t get any judgmental looks from co-workers.

If you are a business struggling with inappropriately dressed employees, a new employee trying to make a good impression, or a company that needs a new dress code, I can help! Whether you’re the employer or employee, I’d love to hear the problems you or your company is facing and help you work towards a solution. Just send an email to: empowerme@leslie-friedman.com to start the conversation.

To your success,

Leslie

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13 Ways to look like a million for under $10

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedin13 ways to look like a million

 

You don’t have to have a million dollars to look like you do! Here are 10 quick tips to have you looking your best…for just $10 or less.

 

1, Wear clothes that fit. You wouldn’t believe how much of a difference this makes- and how many people wear ill fitting clothing. Wearing clothing that fits your body shape is incredibly important and sometimes that means getting clothing altered. (Not sure what your body shape is? Take the quiz here) Many men’s stores will hem pants for free and do other alterations for minimal cost. Nice department store might also offer this service. Going to a tailor to bring in a button down shirt will cost around $15 while changing hemlines averages around $10. If you know someone who sews, they might be willing to do it for free or for an exchange (did anyone say wine?) Cost= $0+ depending on the alteration. 

 

2. Be picky when you’re buying second hand. You can save a lot of dough by buying clothing and accessories second hand, but beware of purchasing items that look too rough. Make sure that you actually love the items you are about to purchase and that you aren’t just buying them because ‘they are so cheap!’ Garments still need to fit and be a flattering shape and color. (Hint: here are the top 20 basic garments every woman needs in her wardrobe- plus the perfect fit for your body shape) They should also be in good condition. Pretend like you’re in a high end store where everything is $500 plus. Would you buy the same thing in that situation? This will prevent you from having a closet full (cha-ching!) of mediocre clothes that look okay on you. Cost= $10 or less for second hand clothes. 

 

3. Fill in your eyebrows. As we women get older, we often lose our hair (sorry guys, who didn’t know this), which is why thick locks are a sign of youth. Filling in your eyebrows is one of those changes that can make you look younger without being blatantly obvious. Make sure you choose the right pencil for your hair color and, if you are in a beauty store like Ulta, ask one of the salespeople to teach you how to use it. Cost= Eyebrow pencils on Ulta.com ranged from $1.99-$24. Want more tips on how to dress your age? Here’s how to dress in your 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s, and 60s (coming soon!)

 

4. Improve your sleeping habits. Sleep looks good on everyone, and it’s free (Win-win? I think so) The biggest enemy of good sleep is your cell phone. Avoid looking at your phone (or any other screen) one hour prior to sleeping. I also use the ‘do not disturb (silence except for emergency numbers that I dictate) until my next alarm’ feature. Even if you don’t realize that your phone is glowing and beeping all night long, your REM cycle might. Getting a couple of extra Z’s will improve your complexion and save you money on cucumbers (or all those costly cremes and cover-ups). Cost= FREE!

 

5. Tuck in your shirt. My husband works in a factory setting and this tip works just as perfectly for factory workers as it does for top level executives. Why? Well, tucking in a shirt creates a waist (or any body definition) where there was none which looks better on any body shape. It also looks more pulled together and generally less sloppy. You didn’t just throw on a pair of pants and a shirt, you carefully manipulated your clothing to look more professional. Watch how much of a difference it makes here. Cost= 10 seconds. 

 

6. Take care of your shoes and/or handbags. I have a friend who cleans her shoes off after every wear. It doesn’t matter if they were $300 or $3, she simply takes a clean cloth and wipes them down before putting them in back into her closet. The result is that she always looks polished and sharp, not to mention her shoes last forever. We may be able to fake a million dollar look, but shoes and handbags usually rat us out by looking slightly tattered. If you’re like me and don’t have time to daily clean your shoes, try doing it once a week while you watch tv or talk to a friend. Cost= FREE!

 

how to dress like you have money

 

 

7. Exercise. Another freebie that makes a big difference. When you look at people in upper class society, you’ll see that they look more healthy than their lower socio-economic counterparts. Additionally, clothes look and fit their best when the wearer is at a healthy weight for their body type. You can blame cheap fast food, expensive gym membership access, or a multitude of other things on why this rich/poor healthy/unhealthy paradox exists…or you could do something about your own body. Planning out your meals will save you money, calories, and time. Parking further from your destination, getting off the bus a stop early, or going on an evening after dinner stroll in your neighborhood are all simple ways to start living a healthier life. Cost= FREE + a little time.

 

8. Learn how to barter. You may not have the financial resources it takes to buy the best clothes and purchase the best haircuts, but you might have something else. Think about what talents or services you provide and then use those to barter for what you want. Maybe you are great at social media. Ask a local salon who’s struggling with their online presence whether you can help them with their social media in exchange for haircuts/colors. This usually works best with friends and acquaintances. Just make sure that you are good at the service you’re offering and that you follow through on your end of the deal. Cost= FREE (or the cost of your services). Here are some quick tips on bartering from RealSimple.com

 

9. Straighten up. Standing up straight can visually make you look 5 lbs lighter and years younger! There’s nothing more aging than a hunching posture. Look at any wealthy business person and you will see someone who carries himself or herself (upright!) with confidence. Practice sitting up straight while at your desk, typing, or even browsing your phone. Cost= FREE

 

10. Break out the blush. Our cheeks naturally flush when we are excited or aroused. This almost always reads positively by the person viewing you, because they subconsciously connect your excitability to being with them. Luckily, all it takes to fake this effect is to throw on some blush. A little bit of blush will immediately make you look fresh, vibrant, and youthful. Cost= $2.99+ from your local drugstore. 

 

11. Choose colors that flatter your skin tone. Everyone has a certain color or set of colors that really bring out their best features. Work on identifying your colors (I dedicated a whole lesson to this in my e-course: The Ultimate #STYLE Guide!) and then start wearing them! Cost= nothing if you have clothing in your ‘good’ colors. If you don’t? Try buying a scarf. It’s a lot cheaper than buying a whole new shirt and you can pair it with items you already have.

 

12. Smile. I know it sounds cheesy, but have you ever hung out with someone who has a resting bitch face? Even if they’re saying nice, friendly things it’s hard to not think that they are constantly judging you, or are unhappy about hanging out with you, or are just plain uninterested. Cost = some face exercises.

 

13. Discover the many uses of coconut oil. Coconut oil is incredible. It will make your hair shiny and strong, your skin smooth as a baby’s butt, and your teeth several shades whiter…to name a few. Beauty gurus have been touting the positive beauty affects of coconut oil for years! Check out a whole list of things you can do with the magical stuff here. Cost = $7.99 usually for a jar.

 

Above all, remember to take control of the things you can, and don’t worry about the things you can’t! Money can’t buy attitude, manners, kindness, or presence.

Cheers,

Leslie

 

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4 Easy Ways to Dress Young…without looking like teenager

FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinThe most common woe clients come to me with goes like this: “I don’t want to look frumpy because I feel young, but I also don’t want to look like my 16-year-old daughter.”

 

These middle-aged women are often vibrant, active, and far from looking like how their mothers did at the same age. But, it’s one thing to feel young and another thing to dress young.

 

Here are four easy ways to strike a balance between frumptastic and teenager.

 

How to dress young without looking like a teen

 

 

  1. Stay out of the juniors department (and stores specifically geared at teens).

This one sounds easy, but it can be challenging. Have you ever wandered into the juniors department thinking, “oh, that’s cute” without even realizing where you were? This happens all the time to me at Target. (Speaking of Target, did you read about what happened when I picked out plaid outfits for every age there?) One minute you’re looking at work attire and then you’ve crossed the invisible line to juniors clothing. Additionally, try to avoid stores that are geared directly at teens like Abercrombie and Fitch, American Eagle, Forever 21, etc. While you can find suitable items in these places, it’s much easier to pick out age-appropriate items in a place like Banana Republic than H&M.

 

70 c clothes

Sometimes it’s hard to tell where Junior’s ends and everything else begins…especially during sale season.

 

2. Let quality and fit be your guide

Clothes designed for teenagers are made poorly. Companies know that teens and young adults rotate through clothing more rapidly than other age groups, so they don’t spend as much time and money on quality. If you can’t tell whether you’re in the juniors department or not, just ask yourself, “how well is this made?”

 

Choosing well-made clothing is going to make you look more age appropriate because it will actually fit you well. Designers go through lots of measures to make sure their clothing fits their target market properly. That’s why Aeropostale fits one way while Talbots fits another. If an item is too tight, too short, and generally ill-fitting you will look like you stole clothes from your daughter’s closet. On the other hand, if the fit is baggy and ill-fitting in the too big direction, you will look older.

 

Did you know? Every brand has someone called a ‘fit model’ who works for them. The fit model is a woman (or in the case of menswear- a man) who is the exact measurement of that brand’s average size (usually a medium or 6/8). All of the clothes for that brand are based on the body shape of the fit model- and they aren’t always perfect hourglasses. That is why J. Crew fits better on rectangle shaped women and Talbots looks better on apple shaped ladies. Not sure what shape you are? Take the quiz here!

 

 

3. Look for the word: Contemporary 

Many nice department stores like Saks, Barneys, Bergdorfs, etc. divide their products by floor. As a result, you’re likely to step into an elevator and be given options like ‘beauty, shoes, contemporary, designer…” If you don’t understand what defines and differentiates floors like contemporary and designer then you’re already fighting an uphill battle before you’ve begun.

 

Essentially, contemporary is the way to say ‘current’ without saying ‘trendy’. Contemporary clothing is trendy clothing designed for adults rather than teens (that would be the juniors dept.) In a department store like Saks, contemporary clothing is less expensive (though certainly not cheap) and more current and mainstream. It’s not just big department stores that use the word contemporary. Forever 21 uses it to describe their more modern, looser fit collection (which fits more like…forever 31). Current but not trendy is exactly what will make you look your age and these pieces are often categories as ‘contemporary’.

 

 

4. Stay current with silhouettes, not patterns

Loud patterns, bright colors, and offbeat prints will all make you look younger, but not necessarily in a good way. Instead of dressing younger through patterns, do it by keeping your silhouettes in style. That may sound hard, but intuitively you know the difference between a black suit from the 80’s and one from today. The silhouette of today’s black suit is going to be more modern. This is especially important if you are super petite and have to shop in Juniors or Children sections! 

 

When you look through magazines or are window shopping, try focusing on the shape of garments rather than colors and prints. Are boxy jackets everywhere? What about pleated skirts? This will clue you into what is currently in style and allow you to choose colors that may be more age appropriate. With that being said- never buy anything you don’t love or love the way it looks on you! Not all trends and ‘modern silhouettes’ will look good on you and that’s okay. The basic garments that make up your wardrobe should all work well with your body type. Update those garments as they come into style and add trendy pieces only when they work with your wardrobe (and your body!).

 

Lastly-

 

If you’re still in doubt whether an item or an outfit is ‘too old’ or ‘too young’ for you, I always recommend erring on the side of caution; don’t purchase or wear the item/outfit until you can get a second opinion from someone you trust!

 

Dressing appropriately for your age can be tricky. In fact, I created a whole lesson in  The Ultimate #STYLE E-Course that addresses just that issue because it’s so commonly asked about! For the complete guide of style tips, including how to dress for your body type, how to wear jewelry, and how to style scarves, click on The Ultimate #STYLE Course link above.

Cheers!

Leslie

 

Check out these blog posts (60’s+ is coming soon!):

what to wear after 50 3 tips to dressing in your 40's How to dress in your 30's

 

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The Best Clothes for Teachers

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It’s that time of year again! Can’t you just *smell* the crayons??

 

I remember back to school as one of my favorite times of the year- not because of the school part- but because I could get new clothes for the upcoming year. While I’m sure it’s just as fun for a lot of other kids, now that I’m an adult, I see a whole different side of back to school. Specifically speaking…the teacher’s side.

 

I’m going to be honest. I didn’t really understand how tough it was to dress as a teacher until I started having teacher clients and my friends became teachers. All of a sudden I understood the delicate balance that is teacher clothing: stylish but not (anywhere near) sexy, functional but not frumpy, easy to wear but not sloppy….and the list goes on.

 

To help you make that balancing act easy, I’ve written out the three most important steps to choosing a wardrobe that will work for your career as a teacher.

 

Step 1: Choose the right basics

Putting together outfits (no matter what job you have!) is going to be difficult if you don’t have the right basics.

 

The basics are foundational pieces of your wardrobe (think: black pants and white tees) that are the building blocks for all your outfits.

 

The two key attributes about foundational basics of any wardrobe are that:

1) they work for your body shape and

2) they work for your lifestyle.

 

To see my suggestion for 20 basics every wardrobe should have (and what styles are best for your body shape!) click here.

 

It seems pretty obvious, but it’s very important that your basic pieces look great on you and cater to your lifestyle because they are the key players in every outfit you put together. Just like a house, if the foundation is off, then the rest of the building (or in our case- outfit) won’t work.

 

 

Step 2: Embrace the capsule collection

Maybe you’ve heard of capsule collections. They are essentially a small number of clothing items that can all be interchanged with each other to create as many different outfits as possible.

 

There are several benefits to a capsule collection that make it appealing to teachers:

  1. Getting dressed is easy. With a capsule collection, every top works with every other bottom. Getting dressed in the morning is as easy as pulling a top and a bottom out of your closet and putting them together to create an outfit.
  2. Capsule collections save you money. These types of wardrobes are perfect for people on budgets because you are getting the most possible outfit combinations out of the least amount of clothing. That translates to more bang for your buck.
  3. You’ll always look appropriate. Teachers are people too and they *gasp* have lives outside of work. Because of this, not everything in your wardrobe may be appropriate to wear in a school setting. When you have a capsule collection of items for work, then you already know that everything in that collection is approved for work. You won’t have to stand in front of the mirror in the morning wondering if that one shirt is just a little too low.

 

Creating a capsule collection can be daunting. That’s why I wrote a style e-book (shown below) just for teachers! The book includes: an entire capsule collection of 20 items, 12 weeks of outfit ideas from that collection, helpful dressing for your body shape hints, and a practical step by step guide to creating your own teacher wardrobe. Click here to check out the book and learn more.

Step 3: Have fun with your accessories

Capsule collections tend to be more on the neutral side (although they don’t have to!). If you’re looking to spice up your outfits, try experimenting with different accessories.

 

Not only are accessories like jewelry, scarves, and bags fun, but they are also much cheaper than buying a whole new outfit. Bonus: scarves can be a great way to hide that coffee you just spilled down the front of your shirt.

 

Here are a few accessories that I love (with a price that anyone would love!):

 

Matte Bead Layered Necklace, RED, hi-resLina Splatter Tassel Oblong Scarf, , hi-res

Matte bead necklace $18 (left), Tassel scarf $15 (middle), Palm tree brooch $19.97 on sale (right)

Twig & Arrow Embroidered Parrot ClutchOpen Work with Faceted Stone Ring Set 3ct - Universal Thread™ Gold

Parrot clutch $12.97 on sale (left), Stackable rings $9.99 (middle), Floral neckerchief $9.99 (right),

 

Wishing all the teachers out there a wonderful school year!!

 

Cheers,

Leslie

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What I do with your information

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If you’re anything like me, you’ve received a million emails this week about every company and their mother updating their privacy policy.

It’s almost like they all sat down and were like, “we need to update our policies by the end of the week”. Which actually, isn’t that far from the truth.

The European Union has created new data collection and privacy laws that go into place May 25, 2018 (aka: Friday). The new regulations are called GDPR (general data protection regulations) and apply to any EU citizen AND any business that collects any sort of information (yes, that includes names or email addresses) from EU citizens.

As someone who has wonderful people from all over the EU visit my website, get my freebies, and buy my products, I needed to make sure I was compliant with these new laws. So, I’ve spent some really great quality time this week reviewing the GDPR and making sure I’m up to par, and here’s what I’ve learned…the purpose of GDPR is to keep people from misusing your information. I guess I knew that, but I thought compliance would be a lot harder than what I’m already doing (since I’m pretty much 100% compliant already). What it really does, is keep people from pulling marketing gimmicks on unsuspecting visitors (like pre-checking boxes for you and stuff like that).

How many times have you signed up for one thing (like an e-book) and then started to get emails from the same sender about all sorts of unrelated and unwanted things? That’s what the GDPR is trying to stop.

So, let’s go back to all those emails you’ve been getting. Most of them say something like, “we’ve updated our privacy policy and would like you to agree to the new policy. Please read it here”

I don’t know about you, but I’m not going to take the time to read through their whole privacy policy. I mean, maybe if I had insomnia I was trying to cure, but I have a lot better things to do. I found myself wishing that they would just summarize it in easy language for me to skim over. That’s when I got the idea to do that with my own privacy policy.

If you want (maybe you’re trying to cure some insomnia!?), you can read my whole privacy policy here.

For everyone else, I thought I’d just write a really candid letter about what I do with any information you give me. (aka: what the privacy policy says)

Enjoy

xoxo, Leslie

 


Dear Awesome people that visit my website, 

Thanks for stopping by! You may notice that I have lots of great resources about how to look your best, communicate effectively, and improve your personal brand.

It’s my goal to provide you with incredible resources to help you be your best self. Some of those resources are paid (e-courses, etc.) and some are absolutely free. Maybe you’ve already watched a webinar or downloaded a free cheat sheet and know what I’m talking about.

The easiest way for me to get these freebies to you, is via email. Lots of websites may spam you to death the minute you give out your email, but we won’t. (If you want to see a full description of what happens when I get your email, look at the PPS at the end).

Once you give me your email here’s what we WILL and WILL NOT do:

Things I DO with your email:

    • Use it to give you the free or paid resource you requested
    • Save it in a safe place (secure third parties Mailchimp and Convertkit hold my email list)
    • Communicate with you personally if you reach out with questions, problems, comments, etc.

Things I DON’T do with your email:

  • Spam you. Why? 1) It’s rude. 2) I personally write all my own emails. I don’t have a huge team behind me doing all the email writing work. I want to make all my communications with you as personal as possible, so I write everything. The point? I don’t have time to write you a million spam emails. I don’t even have time to write more than a couple follow up emails.
  • Sell it to someone else. Also, rude. Shame on people who do this. I know how important email addresses are. I wouldn’t want  you to sell my info, so I wouldn’t sell yours. It’s that easy.
  • Anything else shifty.

Wow, isn’t that easy? Essentially, it all comes down to respect. I respect you. If you asked to be taken off a list (aka: unsubscribe) or to be forgotten, then I’ll do it.

You may also be wondering about other types of information I collect. Basically, I don’t have ANY of your information until you give it to me in the form of signing up for something (like a webinar or freebie) or writing a comment on a blog post. Any information collected from you leaving a comment (IP address, name, etc) is only seen by me and a third party that checks to make sure it isn’t spam. Neither I nor the third party do anything else with that info. We don’t sell it, auction it off, give it away on business cards…we just let it hang out in the comment info. (Boring, right?)

And that’s it. 

Bottom line?

I don’t want to send you anything you don’t want. I don’t want to make money off your information. I don’t want to be super creepy with your IP address (I wouldn’t even know how if I wanted to!)

I want to help you look and feel your very best. I want to help you create a killer personal brand. I want to help you dress like the confident, powerful BAMF you are.

And, most importantly, I want to respect you.

Highest Regards,

Leslie Friedman

www.leslie-friedman.com

 

Ps. Want to chat? I’m not elusive, send me an email here: empowerme(at)leslie-friedman.com and I’ll reply ASAP.

Pps. Here is pretty much exactly how this process works. 

  1. You visit my website and see something that catches your interest. Let’s say it’s my webinar on How to Get Dressed in 3 Minutes. 
  2. You enter your email address to have the webinar sent to you. You receive the webinar and hopefully enjoy it and learn a lot!
  3. I receive a notice that someone has signed up to watch the webinar and I receive your email address. Your email address goes automatically into either Mailchimp or Convertkit where it is safely stored in groups according to what you watched or downloaded (this helps me know what you might like in the future!)
  4. You will get a follow up email asking how you liked the webinar and if you’d like any other emails about style tips. If you say you would like occasional emails about style tips, I send you emails about style tips. I also like to send coupons and freebies in these emails, so you don’t want to miss out. But I never send anything ‘off topic’. 
  5. That’s it. No one else sees your email address and I don’t sell it or do anything weird with it. Boring, right?

 


 

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3 Steps to Becoming a Personal Stylist

FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinToday I want to take a hot second and address the #1 question I get asked via email from wonderful readers just like you: How do you become a personal stylist (or image consultant)? 

Side note: I’m going to use the term personal stylist because it is more widely known, even though I go by ‘Image Consultant’. There are many other names for similar services including: wardrobe stylist, fashion consultant, personal shopper, etc. For our purposes here, I are going to use the word personal stylist as blanket term for someone who provides fashion and style services.

Do you remember having to shadow people in middle and high school? The whole idea was that you followed a professional around for the day to see what they did, and gain insight into whether you would enjoy that career or not.

I’m not going to lie, I don’t remember who I shadowed during those times. But I sure know it wasn’t a personal stylist.

In fact, I didn’t even know that was a career option until I was in my twenties…post college. Despite having constant walking proof around me daily, I didn’t realize that most people couldn’t (or didn’t enjoy) dressing themselves.

It sounds really stupid now, but I didn’t realize that this was a career option until people starting stopping me in public places to ask things like…

“Would you go through my closet for me and tell me what looks good and what doesn’t?”

I thought it was a joke (I was a fashion designer at the time, not a wardrobe consultant!) until I realized people were serious.

Since then, I’ve gone on to build a successful personal stylist business all over the country. And here’s the cool thing. If I can do it, so can you. And it doesn’t have to be super scary.

I made a lot of mistakes and also did a lot right during my early days of personal styling, but I was pretty much on my own. No one showed me the ropes. No one gave me advice. I was just winging it.

Here’s my thing. I don’t want you to be in the same position as me.

I don’t want you to just ‘wing it’.

If you want to be a personal stylist, then I want you to walk into this new adventure informed and empowered and ready to kick some booty.

Which brings us to the next part. How do you actually BECOME a personal stylist?

Becoming a personal stylist isn’t like becoming a heart surgeon. There is no exact path to follow in order to become a stylist. With that said, I’ve looked back on my years as a stylist and have boiled down a no-nonsense list of the main 3 steps you need to follow.

Step 1: Get Informed

 

Before you just go bounding into a new job/side hustle/whatever you want to call it…ask yourself these questions:

  1. Do I know what it entails?
  2. Would I actually like performing the services that are most needed in my community?
  3. How much time do I have? Or, Do I have enough time?
  4. What have I done in the past that sets me up to be a good personal stylist?

 

Seriously think about each of the these questions and if you don’t have the answer, find it out!

Here’s something I learned from working all over the country. Different services are more requested in different regions of the US. When I lived in the Midwest, most of my clients were middle aged mothers who still felt young but didn’t want to dress like their teenage daughters. In Flagstaff, Arizona, most of my clients were consultants that traveled a lot and knew they couldn’t wear hiking boots to meetings on the East Coast but had no idea what to wear. I know these sound really specific, but it is true that the bulk of my clients in different places had very specific needs that almost seemed regional (or town based).

Do some research. The easiest way to find out what services people need is by asking them questions like this: What’s your biggest fashion problem? If you could change one thing about your style or clothing, what would it be? What do you hate most about shopping or getting ready in the morning? These questions will lead you directly to the need and allow you to figure out what personal styling in your town would actually entail. Then, you need to decide if it’s something you’d actually enjoy doing. Maybe you don’t like the idea of going through people’s closets. If that’s the main need, you may want to reconsider being a personal stylist.

Before you just jump in, do some research. Ask around. Watch some free webinars. Read blog posts. And most importantly, talk to your future clients! I can’t stress how important the information gathering stage is!!! If you do it right (like, talking to your future clients about the services they might need), you’ll set yourself up for success.

 

Step 2: Make a plan and get your first clients

 

I can’t tell you how many people get caught up on step 1 and never make it to step 2. They hem and haw and spend thirty years reading blog posts but never actually DO anything. Now’s the time for action. If you’ve decided that you have the time and you want to start a personal stylist business, don’t doddle. The world needs your fashion help.

The first thing you need to do is come up with an action plan. Look through your research notes. What services are most requested? Who is your target market (aka: the type of people requesting the services)? Who do you want your test subjects to be?

Test subjects?

Oh yes. This is very important. Most people think they need all their branding (website, business cards, etc.) done before they start actually working. That’s expensive and, truth be told, not completely necessary. Instead, use this nifty little formula below to start getting clients and making money right away. THEN, once you get money coming in, start investing in a website, business cards, brochures, etc.

Also, don’t forget to put tentative deadlines on your action plan! This will encourage you to keep pushing forward and not get stuck in the research phase. Here’s an example of what your action plan may look like:

I made this very simple action plan in Microsoft Excel (because I’m a giant nerd) but you can do yours on a piece of paper, word document, or anything else. Just so long as you keep yourself accountable!

Step 3: Evaluate, Strengthen, and Brand your business

 

The beauty of having friends and family as test subjects is that you can get honest feedback from them without wasting any money. I’m a big branding person, so I literally created a website, ordered business cards, made coupons, set up social media accounts, and did a million other (not so cheap things) before I even had my second client. This wasn’t a totally bad thing, but looking back, it wasn’t necessary. I wasted so much time changing the website and print materials when I decided to change up services. I also wasted a decent amount of money on business cards/advertising that ended up being outdated because my business had altered directions.

If I had done my research first and listened to what people wanted (instead of providing what I thought they needed) and started with several close friends and family members BEFORE branding, I would have saved so much time and money.

Learn from my mistakes. Get out and talk to people before you start all the branding stuff. This not only saves you time and money but it also does something very important: it primes your audience.

What?

Yeah, I said primes. You know how you prime an engine before you start it? Doing your research helps prime your future clients. It helps them get ready for the awesomeness you’re going to bring with your personal styling business.

Think about it. If you just walk up to your Aunt and announce yourself as a personal stylist (here’s my business card Aunt LouLou) and ask her if you can freshen up her wardrobe she’s going to have a lot of questions, and rightfully so, some hesitation. Compare that this scenario: You are thinking about becoming a personal stylist. You contact Aunt LouLou and explain that you are considering this and would like to ask her some questions. While talking to her about her fashion problems, you learn she feels like her wardrobe is in a rut. You then propose helping her ‘freshen up her wardrobe’ and get out of the rut in exchange for recommendations if she’s happy with your work. How much more likely is she to say yes? Like, 10 fold…because she’s been primed. You already made her understand her need and even talk about it out loud. Psychologically, this makes her acknowledge her own wardrobe shortcoming and much more likely to accept your solution (aka: services).

Priming your Test Subjects (I’ll refer to them as clients) can also have these benefits:

  1. Clients will associate personal styling with fashion help instead of having no idea what it means.
  2. Clients are very likely to talk with their friends before/during/after your services and thus priming the next round of people to be recommended to you.
  3. Clients are more likely to do more for you (whether that be paying more, recommending more, giving you networking advice, helping with your business, etc.) when they feel a problem of theirs is being solved.

(Side note: If you’re a marketing person, doing research and talking one on one with future clients- what I am calling priming here- can also be thought of as making hot leads out of warm leads)

Once you’ve primed your test subjects and performed services on them, it’s important to take a minute to evaluate. Evaluate what they thought about the service and their insight into making it better. Also, evaluate how YOU felt during the service. Did you like it? Did you hate it? Think of it as one big test run. If you don’t enjoy being a stylist it’s easy to back out now. You have pretty much nothing, except time, invested. If you hate it, leave it. If you love it, keep working through your action plan and start branding your new business!!

And that’s it. That’s the best way to start.

I know there’s so much more that goes into starting your own personal stylist business, but this really is it in a nutshell.

We tend to make things too complicated, but these three steps are the easiest and best way to start a personal stylist business today. (Literally!)

With that said, if you’re interested in learning more about the basics of starting your personal stylist business, check out this webinar I recorded for you.

It’s one of my most popular webinars and it’s totally free to watch.

In it, we discuss what a personal stylist IS, what services you can provide, how to figure out how much time you have, and a more in-depth discussion of getting clients using the model above.

 

Happy Styling,

Leslie

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why you should care about personal branding

What is personal branding (and why should you care?)

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Have no clue what personal branding is? You’re not alone.

 

When you work around something day in and day out, it’s easy to forget that not everyone understands what you’re talking about. This is something I’m reminded of on a daily basis, specifically, every time I introduce myself.

 

My standard introduction used to be: “Hi, my name is Leslie Friedman and I’m an image consultant who specializes in personal branding”.

 

Forget knowing what personal branding means, most people couldn’t make it past image consultant. “What exactly IS an image consultant?” is a question I began to answer so many times that I added a little extra phrase to my introduction.

 

“Hi, my name is Leslie Friedman and I’m an image consultant that specializes in personal branding. Which basically means that I help people leverage their appearance to be more successful.

 

This not only happens when I throw out the term ‘image consultant’ but when I talk about personal branding. I incorrectly assume that most everyone knows what personal branding is, when actually, the exact opposite is true. If you’re one of those people, this article is for you.

 

I’m staying away from any industry jargon or other confusing terms to simply explain what personal branding is, and of course, why you should give a damn.

what is personal branding?

So, let’s get started shall we?

 

The concept of personal branding has been around for less than 20 years. It all started when this guy, Tom Peters, wrote an article in 1997 for the magazine Fast Company about this radical new idea- if companies can have brands, then so should people.

 

A brand is what makes a company distinctive and recognizable. Just think of Starbucks or McDonald’s. Not only do you immediately think of the products these places sell, but you also see the golden arches and green medallion symbols from the logos. All of these special little things that go into making a company recognizable, help create its brand.

 

Peters proposed that people could have similar brands. They too could have all those ‘special little things’ that go into making them recognizable as a person. Famous people are pros at this. Think of Beyonce, Steve Jobs, or even President Trump. My guess, is that most of you could recognize these people instantly if you were given a verbal description of who the person is/what they’ve done, or if you saw them. You could do that for the same reason that you could identify Starbucks or McDonald’s if you heard someone describe them or if they showed you a picture. These celebrities and companies have done the same thing- created brands around themselves. They decided what they wanted to be known for and then made sure their actions, words, and appearance all reflect those attributes.

personal branding secrets and checklist

I know what you’re thinking, “I’m not a celebrity, and I don’t want to be one..so why should I care? Why should I go through the effort of developing a personal brand? What’s in it for me?”

 

Here’s the thing; you don’t have to be a celebrity (or even like the person) to learn from what they’re doing and use it to help you.

 

Essentially, celebrities are using personal branding techniques for job security. The longer that person is in the spotlight and people know about them, the higher the chance they’ll be able to sell products, etc. Far less people would buy Beyonce albums if she wasn’t popular and people didn’t know who she was.

 

In the same manner, we can use personal branding to make us more successful. What do you want? Job security? Money? The ability to travel? A family? You can get pretty much anything you want by adjusting your personal brand.

 

Here’s a side by side example with an actual brand, a celebrity, and a ‘normal’ person, to help you make the connection.

 

Company/Person Goal Ways to achieve goal
Beyonce To sell albums Works to become nationally recognized and remains in the spotlight
Walmart To sell low price goods Spends lots of time sourcing goods that are less expensive for its stores
A 5th Grade Teacher To help students learn Shows up to work on time and is focused on doing their job

 

Your brand (personal or corporate), is the set of characteristics you/your company is uniquely known for and exhibits through their actions, words, and appearance.

personal branding quote

Keeping their end goals in mind, look at the chart below and see how each company/person from above uses specific actions, words, and appearances to achieve their goals.

 

Company/Person Actions Words Appearance
Beyonce Makes music and goes on tours Talks about herself as a celebrity Wears ‘news worthy’ ensembles
Walmart Sells low cost items at its stores Advertises to specific target markets about their deals No frills stores are clean but not fancy
A 5th Grade Teacher Help students one on one to learn material Builds up students with her/his words Dresses appropriately to teach students

 

It seems really simple, right? If Walmart wanted to sell expensive products to the ultra-rich they wouldn’t sell low cost items, advertise to everyday people like moms, and have a basic store. Likewise, if a teacher didn’t really want to help students they wouldn’t care about showing up on time, actually teaching, and wearing clothes that don’t distract students.

 

Our reputation, or how we want to be known, needs to make sense with our end goals and needs to be supported by our personal brand. We all have a personal brand. We all have traits that make us uniquely who we are. What we don’t always do, is focus on developing and nurturing that brand.

personal branding cheat sheets

We go through the motions and do what we’re supposed to because that’s what our boss and HR want us to do, but we don’t often think about how we could be using everyday things like actions, words, and our appearance to get ahead.

 

If our desire is to travel, maybe culture awareness is a strong characteristic that we embody.

 

If our desire is to make a lot of money, maybe a strong work ethic and go-getter attitude are what we are known for.

 

If our desire is to find a spouse, maybe dressing a way that shows your value will attract the right person.

 

Essentially, your personal brand is the process of creating and managing your reputation.

 

Personal branding isn’t a difficult concept, but it does take a decent amount of self-awareness. What do you want? (even if it’s just for the next 5 years) How are you being perceived right now? How do you want people to think of you? Once you start exploring these questions, you’ll be on your way to cultivating an incredible personal brand.

 

I know creating a personal brand isn’t easy. You may want to start, but have no idea how. That’s perfectly normal. So, normal in fact, that I created an entire e-course (including a 20+ page workbook) that walks you through creating your unique brand step by step. This is for anyone who wants a helping hand through the process, and is serious about really developing a brand that will help reach your goals. Sounds good? Click the button below to get instant access to the beginning of the course (for FREE!).

personal branding e-course

Questions about personal branding? I’d love to hear them! Comment below.

 

Obsessed with your success,

Leslie

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beauty from the inside out part 2: pretty girl problems

Pretty Girl Problems

FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinPart 2 to the 6-Part Series: Beauty from the Inside Out
Featuring Becky Lauren and Leslie Friedman

Beauty from the Inside Out is a 6-part series exploring the struggle women have every day, from looking nice and staying healthy to taking jobs and choosing friends, because we want to or because society expects it from us. Each week we’ll discuss a new topic, culminating in how we can break the mold as strong, confident, beautiful women.

Part 2: Pretty Girl Problems

Prepare yourself for this one, ladies, it’s going to be a long one.  It’s something that really affects me in every way every single day and it’s very important to me…

In today’s age we’re still living in a world where most career women struggle working in ‘a man’s world’.

I still laugh every time I watch Kristen Bell’s video ‘Pinksourcing’ . In the video she makes fun of everything that is unfair about being a women in the workforce.

I’ve known what I wanted to be since I was 8 years old. I was going to be “in the special forces”.  I of course didn’t really know what that meant other than wearing a uniform and carrying a gun and beating up bad guys.  At 8 years old I had no idea this dream wasn’t actually a possibility for me.

It wasn’t until I started growing up that there limitations on what I could dream and achieve.  Some of these limitations were real and some were conditioned. “Oh a pretty little girl like you can’t be a Soldier, that’s for boys!”

Do you have pretty girl problems?

Can women be in the special forces? At the time – no. In today’s age – kinda.  But were there really cool jobs similar to that women could do? Absolutely!

As I started to grow into my professional career in the corporate world sitting at the large mahogany conference room tables of ‘old white men’ the reality of working in a man’s world began to sink in.

If you were an attractive woman, you obviously got the job because of your looks.  If you were unattractive you obviously got the job because nobody wanted you so you had nothing to do but to work. (This is actually something that’s been told to me by numerous people over the years)

As a woman working in a field dominated by men, I am confronted by the double standard every single day. The struggle for me has always been where the line is, when to give into it, and when to fight it.

 

Where does ‘Pretty Girl Problems” come from? It’s from years of being told that my problems weren’t important.  When I would give a presentation to someone much higher up in the company than I and they couldn’t stop staring at my legs (I’m 5’10) I was told it’s a ‘pretty girl problem’.  When I had people from the company texting me slightly questionable things when they were drinking it was a ‘pretty girl problem’. When people assume I got my job because I’m a woman and they needed to make a ‘quota’, that’s a ‘pretty girl problem’.

 

“Oh it must be SO HARD getting all that attention from men all the time.” My male co-workers would joke. Yes. It is, and no, I don’t like it.

I once had a mentor, she was mid 50s, sit me down when I was an intern and give me some of the best advice I still look at today. She took me for coffee and as we sat down said “You, my dear, are going to have some trouble in this world.” The piece of advice she gave me which I still use is this: “There is a double standard that you aren’t going to get rid of in your lifetime, so you might as well take advantage.  Your looks will open doors to you that it won’t for men. Don’t be afraid to use that, but you better make sure that when you open your mouth you are smarter than anyone else in the room.  You better floor them!”

Leslie and I talked a lot about how to dress as a woman in the workplace. I’ve always joked that I have a pendulum that swings from ‘I don’t give a fuck to lesbian pant suit’.  I’ve been told that if I don’t want men to stare at me I shouldn’t wear dresses and skirts, form fitting clothing, or low tops.  I don’t disagree that if I avoided wearing those things I might not get as many looks.  My issue lies in who’s side society is taking.  

By saying “she’s asking for it. She’s wearing a pencil skirt with a shirt tucked in, you can see her shape” what we’re really saying is that we’re choosing men. We are choosing that their opinions and actions mean more than a woman’s. THEY can’t handle themselves so we need to change how we exist in the world. No. I just won’t.

Except I do. I think we all do.  I’ll have an inappropriate comment made to me or someone stare just too much and the next day I’m practically wearing a mumu with my hair in a bun and no makeup. And I’ll do that for a few days so I don’t get the attention. And in that moment, in that decision, I’ve let them win.beauty quote

 

The crazy thing is, that these same problems happen to women regardless of what industry they’re in. As an image consultant, Leslie works with women across all different fields look their best especially when they are going to work. She’s noticed that a ‘pretty girl’ double standard is present in almost all workplaces, but does vary from industry to industry. For example, a woman who wears heels in a more casual teaching environment is judged as being sexy and trying too hard while a woman who wears flats in a high power ad agency might be seen as lazy and unprofessional. Likewise, it is deemed equally inappropriate (by the men who have always set the standards, of course!) for a woman engineer to wear a skirt at a manufacturing conference as it is for a woman lawyer to wear a pant suit in the courtroom.

So, what’s Leslie advice to these women? Dress in a way that makes you feel comfortable, reflects the way you want to be perceived to your client (ex. Professional, capable, etc.), and is appropriate for your workplace (I don’t want to see tight pants, short shorts, or unbuttoned tops on men either). If you feel comfortable in a skirt, wear an office appropriate skirt. If you feel incredible in a power suit, wear your power suit. Your appearance certainly has an affect on others, but it also affects YOU! The way you look should empower you, while setting the stage for your actions- which is the real secret to breaking barriers.

Pretty Girl Problems affect all of us.  I have a million stories of this and I’m sure each and every one of you do as well. We know women who exacerbate the issue and we know women who hide from it. I’ve always tried to live my professional life and professional friendships with integrity – in a way where I had fun, I dressed fashionably but appropriately, and acted in a way that nobody would question my intentions.  “Live your life in a way that if someone spoke bad about you, nobody would believe it”

Xoxo
Becky and Leslie

P.S. Don’t miss out on past or future videos and posts in this series! Sign up HERE to get access to everything!

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Dealing with Jealousy (and using it to your benefit!)

Dealing with Jealousy (and how to benefit from the green monster)

FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinPart 1 to the 6-Part Series: Beauty from the Inside Out
Featuring Becky Lauren and Leslie Friedman
Beauty from the Inside Out is a 6-part series exploring the struggle women have every day, from looking nice and staying healthy to taking jobs and choosing friends, because we want to or because society expects it from us. Each week we’ll discuss a new topic, culminating in how we can break the mold as strong, confident, beautiful women.

Part 1:
Dealing with Jealousy
(and learning to benefit from the green monster)

 
Jealousy doesn’t always get the best rap.
 
Think about it. If you were describing your best attributes during a job interview, you probably wouldn’t throw out, “Oh, and one of my all time greatest character traits is my jealous nature”.
 
No, of course not. But jealousy isn’t all bad, and it can actually help you decide where priorities and values lie. For that reason, it’s the perfect place to start this 6 part series.How to use jealousy to become a better person
 
Jealousy is really like alcohol in a lot of ways. It can lead you to hurt yourself, or to help yourself. The choice is yours. We’ll talk about how it’s hurtful, first, because that’s the aspect we’re most familiar with.
 
We’ve all watched our girlfriend get drunk and start saying something stupid or pouring out her inner most feelings. It’s a painful thing to watch, especially if you’re sober. It’s obvious that she is saying something hurtful or acting stupid, but she totally doesn’t see it. It’s similar with jealousy. As women we’ve somehow been ingrained to minimize what we are jealous of. Just like the drunk girl spilling her guts, you can spot the jealous girl a mile away. “Oh well she has an easy job and can work out whenever she wants” or “she’s just showing off because she’s trying to get a man”.
 
Has another woman ever made a snide comment to you about your hair, weight, or appearance in general? It’s hurtful and probably the result of jealousy. You have something they don’t, and in order to satiate the jealousy they bring you down.

“Calling somebody else fat won’t make you any skinnier. Calling someone stupid doesn’t make you any smarter. And ruining Regina George’s life definitely didn’t make me any happier. All you can do in life is try to solve the problem in front of you.” – Mean Girls

 
Women deal with jealousy in two main ways: motivation or negativity. Some will see their co-workers new car and think ‘that car is awesome, I need to work harder to get one’ while others will say ‘I’ll never be able to afford a car like that’. Which one are you? When other people have something you want does it motivate you to work towards it? Or retreat and hide from it? If you’re the latter then it’s time to change your approach! It’s time to start using jealousy in your favor!
 
A lot of introverts or people with social anxiety like to drink when they’re at social functions. The ‘liquid courage’ makes them feel less stressed about talking with others.
 
These people understand how alcohol affects them (and knows exactly where their limit is) and how they can use it to make themselves better at a specific task.
 
mean girls quote about jealousy
You can take the same jealous (that can be equally bad if not controlled) and use it to your advantage. No matter how jealousy affects you, in three easy steps you can start putting it to use for your personal benefit.
 
Step 1: Identify what triggers jealousy for you. Whenever you have a jealous thought (I want.., I wish…, She has the best…,) stop and think about what they have that you want. You don’t even have to do anything about it at this point, just write it down or remember mentally. Eventually, you will see a pattern. Maybe, it’s other women’s bodies that you are jealous of. Maybe, it’s their clothes, cars, homes, or how they seem to raise their kids. Whatever it is, find your main triggers. Remember to separate the person of jealousy from the attribute you are jealous of. You aren’t jealous of Staci, you’re jealous of her jet-set lifestyle.
 
Step 2: With each trigger, really ask yourself- is this something I actually want? It sounds stupid, but you’d be surprised. I used to envy every single post someone I follow put on Instagram. “She has the life! It’s so wonderful!” However, one day I really thought about if I would want that life and the answer surprised me- it was no. She travels constantly and is never at home with her family. She has a stressful job and works for months at a time without breaks. It may have looked great (and I hope it’s really great for her!) but it wasn’t what I wanted. I only really liked the idea of it.
 
Step 3: Once you find out the triggers that point to something you actually want, set some goals and use the things you want as an incentive to do better and be better. Remember- don’t compare yourself to the person you envy. They are at a different place in their life as you. Instead focus on the aspect of their person/life that you like, whether that’s their relaxed attitude or dedication to working out.
 
It’s most important to keep your priorities straight. Just like one too many drinks takes you from comfortable and cool to sloppy drunk, the wrong motivations behind jealousy will just make things worse. You need to turn your jealousy into motivation to be better. If you’re jealous of how good of shape your frenemy is in, don’t COMPETE with her, set a new workout and nutrition schedule for yourself and start working out so you look at your own body and say “damn, I look great!”. That mentality turns into putting others down instead of building everyone up together
 
What do you think? Tell us about a time when jealousy has helped or hurt you. What struggles do you have finding that line between healthy and harmful amounts of jealousy? Comment below!
 
Xoxo,
Leslie & Becky
 
Did you miss the intro post or video? Don’t worry! Click here to get access to all past and future parts to the series!

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